Meet our Ambassadors
I am one of the millions of survivors out there, doing well and inspiring others. -- Liana M.

Our Ambassadors are the best source of credible information about the issues confronting the newly diagnosed because they have already been through it.

Our Ambassadors and their stories enable us to create a network of women empowering women, helping the newly diagnosed navigate their breast cancer journey and better advocate for their physical and emotional needs. By sharing their experiences, they offer support and knowledge, reminding others that they are not alone.

  • "It's hard to accept that you have this BRCA gene mutation that can give you cancer."
    Alison F.
  • "If we can make it through this, we can make it through anything."
    Amber H.
  • "This is my choice. I am the aggressor and I'm going to do this on my terms. l felt surrounded by family and friends and two incredible doctors.
    Amy M.
  • "The hardest part is afterward because everything starts sinking in."
    Anastasia H.
  • "...maybe I would have said I'm fine with not doing reconstruction, but it's just always been important to me."
    Angel B.
  • "There really is a blessing. The sky is bluer. Brownies taste so much better. Life is so much more beautiful."
    Angie D.
  • "Cancer is a big word. Ultimately you just want to live. The physical isn't as important as being there"
    Anna C.
  • "Knowing someone is there for you is a big relief. I want to reach out to people who don't have any resources or help or someone to talk to."
    Beth T.
  • "That was my job, to keep her eye on the prize."
    Bob R.
  • "I had an 18-month-old and a 4-year-old at the time, and I just wanted to see them grow up."
    Britt H.
  • "The struggle for me was to find out what she needed and to try and fill that need."
    Carl C.
  • "I've had an unusual experience with breast cancer. I've had it four times."
    Cathy W.
  • "I never think of cancer as a death sentence, but it's definitely an obstacle."
    Celita B.
  • "I really feel like it is a gift from my mother to have this knowledge and to be proactive about it."
    Charity M.
  • "It was just put one foot in front of the next and let's get through this.It's not going to be fun, but it is what it is."
    Cindy M.
  • Do I sometimes sit in church and say, "Thank God I'm here and please let me be here for the next 20 years?" Yeah.
    Daniela C.
  • "The biggest message that everybody needs to remember is that cancer is very curable if it's caught early."
    Deanie E.
  • "When I started chemotherapy I felt really strong. I didn't realize how much being physically challenged by the treatments would impact my attitude."
    Deb H.
  • "I think that my family and I are probably stronger for it. We've learned a lot about ourselves."
    Donna C.
  • "I was diagnosed with Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma. I was overwhelmed with what do I do now."
    Doris L.
  • "It was 14 years later that the second cancer appeared."
    Ellen F.
  • "Maybe briefly there was a temptation to put my head in the sand. No, I need to know what I'm up against and I need to know what that looks like."
    Elizabeth K.
  • "The decision to have the prophylactic mastectomy was made both in the power of making the decision on my terms, but also the fear."
    Emily T.
  • "The day after we got married, I found a lump."
    Erin H.
  • "It is a roller coaster, but it's a ride you have to accept and just do the best you can."
    Frank H.
  • "I had breast cancer twice, so I suppose that makes me a little different."
    Gayle A.
  • "I had a biopsy on Christmas Eve. Right after Christmas, I got a wonderful present that I had cancer."
    Gayle M.
  • "I was diagnosed with Infiltrating Mammary carcinoma. It wasn't part of my plan for my life."
    Hayley A.
  • "I was having pains and everyone says cancer doesn't hurt."
    Hollis Y.
  • "Life deals you all kinds of cards. You handle it. You cannot win the lottery every week. At least it's solvable."
    Ilan L.
  • "Three years prior I had ovarian cancer. God wouldn't give me cancer twice. Would he?"
    Jackie L.
  • "It all began with my very first screening mammogram. I was 40. I was diagnosed with DCIS."
    Jeanna B.
  • "Stand strong in your faith and yourself and knowing that you can beat it."
    Jeff D.
  • "I am not going to let breast cancer beat me. I am going to beat breast cancer. I'm going to win."
    Jen R.
  • "The treatment I chose was truly my choice."
    Jennifer L.
  • "I had found a lump myself and I left it for six months in the hope that it might go away."
    Jenny C.
  • "It's really taught me to focus on the next thing and to trust God and to try to make it fun along the way. That's was a big gift for me"
    Jim H.
  • "I always felt my prognosis was very good and I still do."
    Joni G.
  • "When you hear the word cancer I think you think the worst things you can possibly think."
    Judy M.
  • "I was diagnosed with breast cancer on my 41st birthday. At the time, my son was 3-1/2. The first thing that comes to your mind is that he's too young to not have a mother."
    Julie A.
  • "Life goes on. The sun's going to come up and the sun's going to go down, so you got to make the best of it."
    Julie C.
  • "There's nothing more sobering than to stand in front of your bathroom mirror and look at yourself with no breasts. It was not an option to me to not have reconstruction."
    Kathy I.
  • "The hardest thing was being told that I may not be able to have children."
    Katy M.
  • "I was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer. I didn't think it would happen to me."
    Kelly C.
  • "You can't dwell on the stuff you can't control. We couldn't control the two times being diagnosed with cancer, what we could control was how we reacted."
    Kent C.
  • "My mother had passed away from breast cancer a year and a half before I was diagnosed."
    Kim J.
  • "She sent me to the breast surgeon and they immediately did an ultrasound and biopsy."
    Lane P.
  • "It's the fear that you are not going to be who you were. You kind of lose yourself for awhile. I couldn't be the mom and the wife while I was going through this."
    Laura C.
  • "You just got to keep digging until you know in your heart you're satisfied. Don't just accept everything at face value."
    Lea B.
  • "Life is normal and then things change very quickly, almost in an instant."
    Lee B.
  • "Be willing to open yourself up to others and let others help you."
    Lee Ann B.
  • "Your whole life changes after a cancer diagnosis. You can do it. If I can do it, you can do it."
    Liana M.
  • "There is a certain strength that comes with having cancer. It gave me a lot of hope for other things in my life."
    Lisa W.
  • "They wanted me to be brave so that they didn't need to be scared."
    Louise G.
  • "All of the big life cycle events in my life, my mother missed. I don't want that for my children."
    Marcy K.
  • "I was going to do my personal best. This was my own Olympics. I was going to beat it."
    Marguerite B.
  • "I look at what's important now. I'll just really take one day at a time and enjoy the day."
    Mary Ann W.
  • "It's not just your wife that's going through it, it's you as well."
    Matt H.
  • "The greatest challenge for me was not having support from my spouse."
    Michelle R.
  • "I prayed really hard about how to tell my 10-year-old, because she was going to be the one to remember."
    Nadine W.
  • "I think I took for granted that I would live this long healthy life. I think I learned something that maybe I didn't want to."
    Nancy D.
  • "A year and a half later I got it in the other side. Then I had to have chemotherapy. I really didn't like that I had to lose my hair."
    Nechama L.
  • "The ultrasound tech was taking a lot more time. It's a shocking thing to hear."
    Paige W.
  • "One of the hardest things for me was that moment when Jenny's bandages came off. I didn't know what to expect."
    Paul C.
  • "He said 'You're daughter's got cancer.' It's like just getting kicked in the gut."
    Pete L.
  • "I lost my hair on my 58th birthday. It all fell out. I didn't even cry."
    Polly P.
  • "I just couldn't continue to not know what was going to happen every six months."
    Rachelle B.
  • "There's a medical treatment plan, but then as a family we needed to figure out what our role was, what our emotional treatment plan was going to be."
    Rand H.
  • "I didn't want to feel sick. I didn't want to look sick. And I didn't want to act sick. Most days I'm trying really hard to move forward."
    Randi S.
  • "As much as we try to control things, we can't. When life puts something in your path, you have to work with it."
    Rebekka K.
  • "I didn't have an option to not succeed. I had to keep going."
    Renee R.
  • "I had a HER 2 Nu cancer. Why me? Why did this happen to me? Did I do this to myself? Did I not take care of myself? That's just hard."
    Rose Ann A.
  • "I had to go in as a partner, but at times a silent partner. Don't try to control it."
    Sam B.
  • "I have a family history of breast cancer. I was scared to find out and I was scared not to know."
    Sandi S.
  • "The word cancer...I just couldn't get it out of my mind. I didn't think I would die from it, but I didn't think it was going to be as hard as it was."
    Sandi T.
  • "I used to have to remind her that the day would come when it would be over. Treatment will come to an end at some point. Hold onto that."
    Sean D.
  • "If I had not been the proactive person that I am, I probably wouldn't be alive right now."
    Susan F.
  • "There was no history in my family. It was my first mammogram. I was totally floored by it.
    Susie P.
  • "Finally, I gave in and accepted the support that everyone wanted to give."
    Susin H.
  • "Cancer is something that you hear about a lot, but you never think it's going to happen to you."
    Sylvia G.
  • "You just have to fight for what's important to you. The everyday things that you took for granted, you're willing to fight for."
    Trudy D.
  • "You're in such a vulnerable place."
    Vivian T.
  • "When my sister called and said, "I have the gene," I knew that I had it too."
    Stephanie S.
  • "I'm not the first woman who ever had cancer, so why is it so hard to get good help?"
    Shontanette B.
  • "For me I had to take it one day at a time. I couldn't think I have 36 rounds of this."
    Shirley S.
  • "I woke up one morning with blood on my pillow. I realized it must have been coming from my breast."
    Sherry P.
  • "She said, 'We support each other.' Cancer survivors...they're there for each other."
    Robin H.
  • "As a mother, we don't want our children to worry about us. It was very hard to see her upset about me."
    Mary Ann A.
  • "Reconstruction was very important. You had something negative, but now we are going to do something positive."
    Palmer S.
  • "I think anybody is lucky to survive stage four. They were doing clinical trials. I really think that's what helped me."
    Lynn S.
  • "I got the decision to make the decision myself which was very powerful. We shouldn't have to live in fear."
    Kelly S.
  • "It is a choice to decide to take this on as a challenge as opposed to going to war."
    Jessica D.
  • "At the same time my mother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, my father was diagnosed with breast cancer."
    Carla M.
  • "There's really no good way to tell my family."
    Amy B.
  • "We can talk to each other, and get information and learn."
    Valerie R.
  • "When you have the head of your family sick, you just get closer and ask for help."
    Diana A.
  • "She truly was such an inspiration. I thought if she can be brave, I can."
    Louise D.
  • "It was the scariest feeling I've ever had. Death has never been something that was relevant."
    Cubby W.
  • "My mom's my best friend. I can never imagine a moment in my life without my mom."
    Ansley W.
  • "I was worried about my mom."
    Oscar H.
  • "I know that one day I might have to go through this and I know that I'll have my mom there to support me."
    Caroline K.
  • "One of the harder parts of going through all this was the fact that it catapulted me into menopause."
    Rebekka K.
  • "I wasn't that nervous because she's brave and strong."
    Madison W.
  • "Cancer is a life-changing word. It changes a person's perspective in a lot of ways."
    King A.
  • "When I hit the five-year milestone, it made me feel a lot more confident moving forward."
    Kelly C.
  • "You need to be your best advocate. I think less than 2% get cancer back in the mastectomy breast. I just wasn't feeling right."
    Julie A.
  • "I knew that I couldn't fix it. I tried to just listen to her and be really supportive."
    Jesse P.
  • "I'm there to make her try to feel good about it and feel like it's alright."
    Cy S.
  • "She chose to do whatever it takes to get rid of the cancer. That taught me I needed to do whatever it takes to do anything in my life."
    Chandler A.
  • "She called and said, 'I have cancer.'"
    Ashley S.
  • "The love of my life was diagnosed with breast cancer and I just asked for everybody's thoughts."
    Andrew H.
  • "I really think that she's very smart and very brave because she had to get surgery in the hospital."
    Alana W.
  • "It's hard to accept that you have this BRCA gene mutation that can give you cancer."
    Alison F.
  • "If we can make it through this, we can make it through anything."
    Amber H.
  • "This is my choice. I am the aggressor and I'm going to do this on my terms. l felt surrounded by family and friends and two incredible doctors.
    Amy M.
  • "The hardest part is afterward because everything starts sinking in."
    Anastasia H.
  • "...maybe I would have said I'm fine with not doing reconstruction, but it's just always been important to me."
    Angel B.
  • "There really is a blessing. The sky is bluer. Brownies taste so much better. Life is so much more beautiful."
    Angie D.
  • "Cancer is a big word. Ultimately you just want to live. The physical isn't as important as being there"
    Anna C.
  • "Knowing someone is there for you is a big relief. I want to reach out to people who don't have any resources or help or someone to talk to."
    Beth T.
  • "That was my job, to keep her eye on the prize."
    Bob R.
  • "I had an 18-month-old and a 4-year-old at the time, and I just wanted to see them grow up."
    Britt H.
  • "The struggle for me was to find out what she needed and to try and fill that need."
    Carl C.
  • "I've had an unusual experience with breast cancer. I've had it four times."
    Cathy W.
  • "I never think of cancer as a death sentence, but it's definitely an obstacle."
    Celita B.
  • "I really feel like it is a gift from my mother to have this knowledge and to be proactive about it."
    Charity M.
  • "It was just put one foot in front of the next and let's get through this.It's not going to be fun, but it is what it is."
    Cindy M.
  • Do I sometimes sit in church and say, "Thank God I'm here and please let me be here for the next 20 years?" Yeah.
    Daniela C.
  • "The biggest message that everybody needs to remember is that cancer is very curable if it's caught early."
    Deanie E.
  • "When I started chemotherapy I felt really strong. I didn't realize how much being physically challenged by the treatments would impact my attitude."
    Deb H.
  • "I think that my family and I are probably stronger for it. We've learned a lot about ourselves."
    Donna C.
  • "I was diagnosed with Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma. I was overwhelmed with what do I do now."
    Doris L.
  • "It was 14 years later that the second cancer appeared."
    Ellen F.
  • "Maybe briefly there was a temptation to put my head in the sand. No, I need to know what I'm up against and I need to know what that looks like."
    Elizabeth K.
  • "The decision to have the prophylactic mastectomy was made both in the power of making the decision on my terms, but also the fear."
    Emily T.
  • "The day after we got married, I found a lump."
    Erin H.
  • "It is a roller coaster, but it's a ride you have to accept and just do the best you can."
    Frank H.
  • "I had breast cancer twice, so I suppose that makes me a little different."
    Gayle A.
  • "I had a biopsy on Christmas Eve. Right after Christmas, I got a wonderful present that I had cancer."
    Gayle M.
  • "I was diagnosed with Infiltrating Mammary carcinoma. It wasn't part of my plan for my life."
    Hayley A.
  • "I was having pains and everyone says cancer doesn't hurt."
    Hollis Y.
  • "Life deals you all kinds of cards. You handle it. You cannot win the lottery every week. At least it's solvable."
    Ilan L.
  • "Three years prior I had ovarian cancer. God wouldn't give me cancer twice. Would he?"
    Jackie L.
  • "It all began with my very first screening mammogram. I was 40. I was diagnosed with DCIS."
    Jeanna B.
  • "Stand strong in your faith and yourself and knowing that you can beat it."
    Jeff D.
  • "I am not going to let breast cancer beat me. I am going to beat breast cancer. I'm going to win."
    Jen R.
  • "The treatment I chose was truly my choice."
    Jennifer L.
  • "I had found a lump myself and I left it for six months in the hope that it might go away."
    Jenny C.
  • "It's really taught me to focus on the next thing and to trust God and to try to make it fun along the way. That's was a big gift for me"
    Jim H.
  • "I always felt my prognosis was very good and I still do."
    Joni G.
  • "When you hear the word cancer I think you think the worst things you can possibly think."
    Judy M.
  • "I was diagnosed with breast cancer on my 41st birthday. At the time, my son was 3-1/2. The first thing that comes to your mind is that he's too young to not have a mother."
    Julie A.
  • "Life goes on. The sun's going to come up and the sun's going to go down, so you got to make the best of it."
    Julie C.
  • "There's nothing more sobering than to stand in front of your bathroom mirror and look at yourself with no breasts. It was not an option to me to not have reconstruction."
    Kathy I.
  • "The hardest thing was being told that I may not be able to have children."
    Katy M.
  • "I was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer. I didn't think it would happen to me."
    Kelly C.
  • "You can't dwell on the stuff you can't control. We couldn't control the two times being diagnosed with cancer, what we could control was how we reacted."
    Kent C.
  • "My mother had passed away from breast cancer a year and a half before I was diagnosed."
    Kim J.
  • "She sent me to the breast surgeon and they immediately did an ultrasound and biopsy."
    Lane P.
  • "It's the fear that you are not going to be who you were. You kind of lose yourself for awhile. I couldn't be the mom and the wife while I was going through this."
    Laura C.
  • "You just got to keep digging until you know in your heart you're satisfied. Don't just accept everything at face value."
    Lea B.
  • "Life is normal and then things change very quickly, almost in an instant."
    Lee B.
  • "Be willing to open yourself up to others and let others help you."
    Lee Ann B.
  • "Your whole life changes after a cancer diagnosis. You can do it. If I can do it, you can do it."
    Liana M.
  • "There is a certain strength that comes with having cancer. It gave me a lot of hope for other things in my life."
    Lisa W.
  • "They wanted me to be brave so that they didn't need to be scared."
    Louise G.
  • "All of the big life cycle events in my life, my mother missed. I don't want that for my children."
    Marcy K.
  • "I was going to do my personal best. This was my own Olympics. I was going to beat it."
    Marguerite B.
  • "I look at what's important now. I'll just really take one day at a time and enjoy the day."
    Mary Ann W.
  • "It's not just your wife that's going through it, it's you as well."
    Matt H.
  • "The greatest challenge for me was not having support from my spouse."
    Michelle R.
  • "I prayed really hard about how to tell my 10-year-old, because she was going to be the one to remember."
    Nadine W.
  • "I think I took for granted that I would live this long healthy life. I think I learned something that maybe I didn't want to."
    Nancy D.
  • "A year and a half later I got it in the other side. Then I had to have chemotherapy. I really didn't like that I had to lose my hair."
    Nechama L.
  • "The ultrasound tech was taking a lot more time. It's a shocking thing to hear."
    Paige W.
  • "One of the hardest things for me was that moment when Jenny's bandages came off. I didn't know what to expect."
    Paul C.
  • "He said 'You're daughter's got cancer.' It's like just getting kicked in the gut."
    Pete L.
  • "I lost my hair on my 58th birthday. It all fell out. I didn't even cry."
    Polly P.
  • "I just couldn't continue to not know what was going to happen every six months."
    Rachelle B.
  • "There's a medical treatment plan, but then as a family we needed to figure out what our role was, what our emotional treatment plan was going to be."
    Rand H.
  • "I didn't want to feel sick. I didn't want to look sick. And I didn't want to act sick. Most days I'm trying really hard to move forward."
    Randi S.
  • "As much as we try to control things, we can't. When life puts something in your path, you have to work with it."
    Rebekka K.
  • "I didn't have an option to not succeed. I had to keep going."
    Renee R.
  • "I had a HER 2 Nu cancer. Why me? Why did this happen to me? Did I do this to myself? Did I not take care of myself? That's just hard."
    Rose Ann A.
  • "I had to go in as a partner, but at times a silent partner. Don't try to control it."
    Sam B.
  • "I have a family history of breast cancer. I was scared to find out and I was scared not to know."
    Sandi S.
  • "The word cancer...I just couldn't get it out of my mind. I didn't think I would die from it, but I didn't think it was going to be as hard as it was."
    Sandi T.
  • "I used to have to remind her that the day would come when it would be over. Treatment will come to an end at some point. Hold onto that."
    Sean D.
  • "If I had not been the proactive person that I am, I probably wouldn't be alive right now."
    Susan F.
  • "There was no history in my family. It was my first mammogram. I was totally floored by it.
    Susie P.
  • "Finally, I gave in and accepted the support that everyone wanted to give."
    Susin H.
  • "Cancer is something that you hear about a lot, but you never think it's going to happen to you."
    Sylvia G.
  • "You just have to fight for what's important to you. The everyday things that you took for granted, you're willing to fight for."
    Trudy D.
  • "You're in such a vulnerable place."
    Vivian T.
  • "When my sister called and said, "I have the gene," I knew that I had it too."
    Stephanie S.
  • "I'm not the first woman who ever had cancer, so why is it so hard to get good help?"
    Shontanette B.
  • "For me I had to take it one day at a time. I couldn't think I have 36 rounds of this."
    Shirley S.
  • "I woke up one morning with blood on my pillow. I realized it must have been coming from my breast."
    Sherry P.
  • "She said, 'We support each other.' Cancer survivors...they're there for each other."
    Robin H.
  • "As a mother, we don't want our children to worry about us. It was very hard to see her upset about me."
    Mary Ann A.
  • "Reconstruction was very important. You had something negative, but now we are going to do something positive."
    Palmer S.
  • "I think anybody is lucky to survive stage four. They were doing clinical trials. I really think that's what helped me."
    Lynn S.
  • "I got the decision to make the decision myself which was very powerful. We shouldn't have to live in fear."
    Kelly S.
  • "It is a choice to decide to take this on as a challenge as opposed to going to war."
    Jessica D.
  • "At the same time my mother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, my father was diagnosed with breast cancer."
    Carla M.
  • "There's really no good way to tell my family."
    Amy B.
  • "We can talk to each other, and get information and learn."
    Valerie R.
  • "When you have the head of your family sick, you just get closer and ask for help."
    Diana A.
  • "She truly was such an inspiration. I thought if she can be brave, I can."
    Louise D.
  • "It was the scariest feeling I've ever had. Death has never been something that was relevant."
    Cubby W.
  • "My mom's my best friend. I can never imagine a moment in my life without my mom."
    Ansley W.
  • "I was worried about my mom."
    Oscar H.
  • "I know that one day I might have to go through this and I know that I'll have my mom there to support me."
    Caroline K.
  • "One of the harder parts of going through all this was the fact that it catapulted me into menopause."
    Rebekka K.
  • "I wasn't that nervous because she's brave and strong."
    Madison W.
  • "Cancer is a life-changing word. It changes a person's perspective in a lot of ways."
    King A.
  • "When I hit the five-year milestone, it made me feel a lot more confident moving forward."
    Kelly C.
  • "You need to be your best advocate. I think less than 2% get cancer back in the mastectomy breast. I just wasn't feeling right."
    Julie A.
  • "I knew that I couldn't fix it. I tried to just listen to her and be really supportive."
    Jesse P.
  • "I'm there to make her try to feel good about it and feel like it's alright."
    Cy S.
  • "She chose to do whatever it takes to get rid of the cancer. That taught me I needed to do whatever it takes to do anything in my life."
    Chandler A.
  • "She called and said, 'I have cancer.'"
    Ashley S.
  • "The love of my life was diagnosed with breast cancer and I just asked for everybody's thoughts."
    Andrew H.
  • "I really think that she's very smart and very brave because she had to get surgery in the hospital."
    Alana W.
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